Beware the pronoun: How inclusive language doesn’t mean an inclusive environment — THE CLANDESTINE

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Michela Quecchia is a third year at KCL and a cancer survivor with an interest in healthcare and the environment. Currently juggling OCD and philosophy studies. [Featured Image: Three people with purple hair and green shirts reading they, them, theirs against a light purple background.] Whether you are a student or a professional, or simply […]

via Beware the pronoun: How inclusive language doesn’t mean an inclusive environment — THE CLANDESTINE

LGBTQ Inclusion, Gender Equality in Athletics and Female Representation in the Media – via ESPN

Cornell Athlete Ally hosted ESPN personalities Sarah Spain and Kate Fagan on Wednesday in Statler Auditorium. According to Cornell Athlete Ally president Megan LeDuc, Spain and Fagan were selected to speak at the event because they have both worked towards diversity and inclusion in the sports field. A 2002 graduate of Cornell’s College of Arts […]

via ESPN Personalities Sarah Spain and Kate Fagan talk LGBTQ Inclusion, Gender Equality in Athletics and Female Representation in the Media — Shauna Nichelle

Going Back with Title IX

We’re slowing down for the summer! Instead of our usual roundup of “This Day in Geographic History” (TDIGH) events, here’s a closer look at one historic event that connects to something in the news today. We’ve also matched it with a map or visual, background information, and additional resources. Friday, June 23 TDIGH: Title IX […]

via This Week in Geographic History: Title IX — Nat Geo Education Blog

Bridge-the-Gender-Gap-in-Tech

Overall, it is proven that gender diversity causes businesses perform better financially, enjoy exceptional team dynamics, and attain greater productivity. The real challenge is actively taking these steps within your organisation and getting it done.

 

http://www.women-in-technology.com/single-post/2016/08/30/4-Practical-steps-to-Bridge-the-Gender-Gap-in-Tech

Behavior Modification

As I was looking through some blogs this morning I found one in the Wall Street Journal that suggested that professional women use their initials instead of their full name for a better first impression online.  This really hit me hard and stirred up a lot of emotion.  My first question was ‘Why’.  Why should I have to change my identity so that people online will respect me.

Would you really not contact a person named Elizabeth Smith but you would if it was E. Smith?  Elizabeth Smith might be an expert in her field and an excellent resource.  Not contacting her based on her first name…is that really the criteria to use?

Changing a name to just initials would not be difficult.  And it would not change who I am…but it would.  The blog made me think of young women who are told not to dress in a certain way so that men will not be attracted to them and be tempted to rape them.  Why should women be asked to change so others will give them respect.  Shouldn’t others be the ones who change their behavior?

Let’s ask people to not judge someone by their name, their gender, their hair color, their sexuality, their age.  Get to know people, then you can form an opinion about them, an educated opinion.  There are many good people out there that you might not get to know because you judged them on superficial criteria.

 

http://blogs.wsj.com/experts/2016/09/28/why-women-in-tech-might-consider-just-using-their-initials-online/